Hi, I'm Amy

Welcome to Faith, Reason, and Fiction!

I help Catholic teachers and parents confidently teach their students and children how to know and love God and how to find Him in the world even when He hides in plain sight.

​I’m a Catholic, and I love my Faith.

I also love Pope St. John Paul II, whose writings inspired me to start ​Faith, Reason, and Fiction.  

 

Faith is both what God has revealed to us about who He is, and our response to what He’s revealed. 

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Reason is how we use our minds to see the truth and what is truly good.

Faith and Reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth;  and God has placed in the human heart a desire to know the truth —in a word, to know himself— so that, by knowing and loving God, men and women may also come to the fullness of truth about themselves

 

from Fides et Ratio (link is below)

​Fiction is a form of art, which allows you to develop and enhance your ability to see what is truly good and where the truth is distorted, and how pursuing these in truly good stories can result in “baptizing your imagination” as C.S. Lewis described.

In all of the various forms of art, human artists unite Faith, Reason, and Beauty each of which is an attribute of God My favorite art form is fiction I love a good story!

​Stories sometimes work on us at a deeper level than simply stating the truth does. When you get caught up in a really good story, you live that story through the experiences of the characters.

That experience opens your heart and mind to think about situations and ideas that you might never experience in your own life.

My site address has my name but my blog is called Faith, Reason, and Fiction.

 

That’s partly because Pope St. John Paul II is my patron saint for the blog, but also because I see my role as primarily a catechist, or someone who teaches the Faith.

I’m not a nun or religious sister.

I’m a layperson following my calling to teach people about God and how to be holy by embracing what is truly good and discovering the truth wherever it is found in a fallen world.

Since I love the Truth above all things and embrace the use of reason to get to the heart of truth in goodness in the world, I write about:

  • Different aspects of the Catholic Faith
     

  • How to discover the truth and goodness using reason (which is what critical thinking should be)
     

  • How to discover the deeper meanings in stories
     

  • How to use stories to develop and enhance your ability to see what is truly good and where the truth is distorted, and how pursuing these in truly good stories can result in “baptizing your imagination” as C.S. Lewis described.

Quotes and links to some of my favorite writings from Pope St. John Paul II that inspired me to do what I do: 

Christifideles Laici (The Lay Members of Christ's Faithful People)

The lay members of Christ's faithful people…are those who form that part of the People of God which might be likened to the labourers in the vineyard mentioned in Matthew's Gospel: "For the Kingdom of heaven is like a householder who went out early in the morning to hire labourers for his vineyard. After agreeing with the labourers for a denarius a day, he sent them into his vineyard" (Mt 20:1-2).

The gospel parable sets before our eyes the Lord's vast vineyard and the multitude of persons, both women and men, who are called and sent forth by him to labour in it. The vineyard is the whole world (cf. Mt 13:38), which is to be transformed according to the plan of God in view of the final coming of the Kingdom of God.

"And going out about the third hour he saw others standing idle in the marketplace; and to them he said, 'You go into the vineyard too'" (Mt 20:3-4).

From that distant day, the call of the Lord Jesus "You go into my vineyard too" never fails to resound in the course of history: it is addressed to every person who comes into this world.

Fides et Ratio (Faith and Reason)

Faith and reason are like two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth; and God has placed in the human heart a desire to know the truth—in a word, to know himself—so that, by knowing and loving God, men and women may also come to the fullness of truth about themselves (cf. Ex 33:18; Ps 27:8-9; 63:2-3; Jn 14:8; 1 Jn 3:2).

In both East and West, we may trace a journey that has led humanity down the centuries to meet and engage truth more and more deeply. It is a journey which has unfolded—as it must—within the horizon of personal self-consciousness: the more human beings know reality and the world, the more they know themselves in their uniqueness, with the question of the meaning of things and of their very existence becoming ever more pressing. This is why all that is the object of our knowledge becomes a part of our life. The admonition Know yourself was carved on the temple portal at Delphi, as testimony to a basic truth to be adopted as a minimal norm by those who seek to set themselves apart from the rest of creation as “human beings”, that is as those who “know themselves”.

Moreover, a cursory glance at ancient history shows clearly how in different parts of the world, with their different cultures, there arise at the same time the fundamental questions which pervade human life: Who am I? Where have I come from and where am I going? Why is there evil? What is there after this life? These are the questions which we find in the sacred writings of Israel, as also in the Veda and the Avesta; we find them in the writings of Confucius and Lao-Tze, and in the preaching of Tirthankara and Buddha; they appear in the poetry of Homer and in the tragedies of Euripides and Sophocles, as they do in the philosophical writings of Plato and Aristotle. They are questions that have their common source in the quest for meaning which has always compelled the human heart. In fact, the answer given to these questions decides the direction which people seek to give to their lives.

Catechesi Tradendae (Catechesis in Our Time)

On teaching (“echoing down”) the Faith as Christ’s Final Command

The Church has always considered catechesis one of her primary tasks, for, before Christ ascended to His Father after His resurrection, He gave the apostles a final command - to make disciples of all nations and to teach them to observe all that He had commanded. He thus entrusted them with the mission and power to proclaim to humanity what they had heard, what they had seen with their eyes, what they had looked upon and touched with their hands, concerning the Word of Life. He also entrusted them with the mission and power to explain with authority what He had taught them, His words and actions, His signs and commandments. And He gave them the Spirit to fulfill this mission.

Very soon the name of catechesis was given to the whole of the efforts within the Church to make disciples, to help people to believe that Jesus is the Son of God, so that believing they might have life in His name, and to educate and instruct them in this life and thus build up the Body of Christ. The Church has not ceased to devote her energy to this task.

Letter of His Holiness Pope John Paul II To Artists

To all who are passionately dedicated to the search for new “epiphanies” of beauty so that through their creative work as artists they may offer these as gifts to the world.

“God saw all that he had made, and it was very good” (Gn 1:31)

None can sense more deeply than you artists, ingenious creators of beauty that you are, something of the pathos with which God at the dawn of creation looked upon the work of his hands. A glimmer of that feeling has shone so often in your eyes when—like the artists of every age—captivated by the hidden power of sounds and words, colours and shapes, you have admired the work of your inspiration, sensing in it some echo of the mystery of creation with which God, the sole creator of all things, has wished in some way to associate you.

That is why it seems to me that there are no better words than the text of Genesis with which to begin my Letter to you, to whom I feel closely linked by experiences reaching far back in time and which have indelibly marked my life. In writing this Letter, I intend to follow the path of the fruitful dialogue between the Church and artists which has gone on unbroken through two thousand years of history, and which still, at the threshold of the Third Millennium, offers rich promise for the future.

In fact, this dialogue is not dictated merely by historical accident or practical need, but is rooted in the very essence of both religious experience and artistic creativity. The opening page of the Bible presents God as a kind of exemplar of everyone who produces a work: the human craftsman mirrors the image of God as Creator. This relationship is particularly clear in the Polish language because of the lexical link between the words stwórca (creator) and twórca (craftsman).